While some see the end of a marriage as a reason to celebrate, others may find themselves feeling grief.

According to an article from Psychology Today, it is normal for people to go through “The Five Stages of Grief” when a relationship ends. These five stages are denial, anger, bargaining, sadness and acceptance. This concept was first introduced in the book On Death and Dying by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross to explain how people feel after a loved one dies. However, the feelings that arise at the end of a relationship may be similar.

The Denial Stage Can Be Extended

At the end of a relationship, the other person will still be around. They may be in the same city, may frequent the same places and may even share friends. This may exacerbate the denial stage of the grieving process. It becomes much easier for a person to convince themselves that the breakup did not really happen, or that it is merely temporary and the other person will return soon so the relationship can continue.

Grief And The Divorce Process

The article encourages people not only to accept that the marriage has ended, but to allow themselves to feel all the emotions that go along with this experience.

The divorce process can be complex. There are many decisions that need to be made along the way, and each of them should be weighed based on what is truly best for the person’s future, and for their children’s future. Decisions should not be driven by anger or other powerful emotions, as that may not lead to the outcome that is truly desired.

Allowing oneself to experience and recognize the emotions involved may help to prevent them from interfering with making truly sound decisions that will prove beneficial in the long-term. Having a trusted attorney can also help, as the attorney can put the emotions aside and focus on what is truly best.