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As A Mother, You Have An Important Role And Rights After An Ohio Divorce

When a baby is first born, it may need extra time with a mother for bonding and nursing. A divorce can complicate things such as sleeping schedules, play dates and day care. Many mothers have questions as to their rights to parenting time after a divorce.

At The Law Offices of Saia & Piatt, Inc., we understand that there are special considerations when it comes to mothers and young children. In some cases, there are certain types of support that may be more readily handled by mothers. We work with both mothers and fathers to ensure that each parent spends quality, meaningful time with children.

When Do Mothers Get Special Considerations?

A hundred years ago it was presumed that a father could better support his children financially than a mother could. This played into the cultural notion that fathers should be awarded custody. As we moved into the 20th century more couples got divorced. The courts and society recognized the critical role a mother played for newborns, nursing infants and very young children.

Family courts now consider what is in the best interest of the child first. This means that if a child is nursing or has special needs, or if the mother has been the primary or sole caregiver, it is more likely that the mother will be awarded custody. However, if both parents have played significant roles in the child’s upbringing, it is now widely recognized that the child will benefit from having both parents present.

How often do parents get equal parenting time?

While custody is not always 50-50, it is often 60-40 or 70-30. We recognize the fact that each child and their family dynamics are unique. Therefore, there is not really a “standard” parenting schedule that every family should follow. Instead, each family should create their own tailored plan that works for all parties.

Discussion and cooperation between parents will usually produce the best plans. Of course, if there has been a history of abuse or neglect in the family, including substance abuse, this will greatly affect any parenting plan.

How does a mother’s role change after a divorce?

Most of us have parents or grandparents who had very specific gender roles in the family: the father was the breadwinner and the mother took care of the children and the home. This dynamic has changed drastically in the past few decades. Now, in many cases, both parents work. In some cases, the father has chosen to stay home or take on the majority of the parenting. Same-sex marriages have also changed family dynamics. Divorce is an emotional and stressful time for both parents. Mothers however often have a harder time adjusting to new schedules and letting go of the things they may have done for their children. The other parent may do things differently, but different is not necessarily bad as long as the child is safe. Some mothers find that they are able to get to know their children better when they spend more focused time with them.

What is the hardest obstacle for newly divorced mothers?

A significant number of mothers report they experience increased worry and overwhelming feelings about parenting after a divorce. Sometimes mothers feel they have lost control. They may attempt to gain control by being overprotective or hypervigilant. In other cases, mothers have found they were able to “step up” when needed and “sit back” when the other parent was in charge of the kids. This afforded mothers a refreshing break. Divorce is a big change. But not all change is bad.

Get The Guidance You Need As A Divorced Mother

We offer the personal attention and guidance you need to make sound decisions that align with your goals as a parent. Call 888-444-3036 or send our team an email to set up a free consultation or get started. The attorneys on our team have over 100 combined years of experience. We serve the entire Columbus, Ohio, area.